404 Hwy 19N, Meridian, MS, Copyright © 2019 Carter Miller Sansing, Ltd - All Rights Reserved

Fire Damage

Fire damage can range from
isolated damage to total structural
destruction. Isolated damage areas
will require evaluation for repair
and replacement solutions. Unique
materials such as steel, concrete,
and wood respond differently to
heat events and must be evaluated
individually.
Wood will burn and char. Wood
degrades when exposed to elevated
temperature, temperatures greater
than 150 degrees F, for prolonged
periods of time. Wood exposed to
temperatures, less than 212 degrees
F, for a short duration of time, generally maintain their strength and mechanical properties . Wood
metal plate connected trusses require additional considerations because of how heat effects the metal
and how the metal transmits heat into the wood. In addition, there may also possible chemical
damage from corrosive effects of the fire. Other elements, such as fasteners and support brackets, can
also be vulnerable to long-term acid attack from fire residue.
Structural steel and other metals are extremely vulnerable to the heat produced by fire. Steel can
begin losing strength at 400 degrees F, and it can lose 50% strength at 1050 degrees F. Most structure
fires can average at least 1900 degrees F.
Structural reinforced concrete is also susceptible to the heat produced in structure fires. When
temperatures are below 200 degrees F, the concrete experiences little to no reduction in strength.
Concrete that is exposed to heat between 200 and 300 degrees will experience expansion of the
aggregate and shrinking of the cement matrix. This will result in micro cracking, which introduces
oxygen and water. Air and water infiltration will result in a reduction in serviceability and structure
life. Temperatures above 750 degrees F produce deterioration of the aggregate and a decomposition
of the cement matrix, resulting in a deterioration of structural strength.
404 Hwy 19N, Meridian, MS, Copyright © 2019 Carter Miller Sansing, Ltd - All Rights Reserved

Fire Damage

Fire damage can range
from isolated damage to
total structural
destruction. Isolated
damage areas will
require evaluation for
repair and replacement
solutions. Unique
materials such as steel,
concrete, and wood respond differently to heat events and
must be evaluated individually.
Wood will burn and char. Wood degrades when exposed to
elevated temperature, temperatures greater than 150 degrees
F, for prolonged periods of time. Wood exposed to
temperatures, less than 212 degrees F, for a short duration of
time, generally maintain their strength and mechanical
properties . Wood metal plate connected trusses require
additional considerations because of how heat effects the
metal and how the metal transmits heat into the wood. In
addition, there may also possible chemical damage from
corrosive effects of the fire. Other elements, such as fasteners
and support brackets, can also be vulnerable to long-term
acid attack from fire residue.
Structural steel and other metals are extremely vulnerable to
the heat produced by fire. Steel can begin losing strength at
400 degrees F, and it can lose 50% strength at 1050 degrees
F. Most structure fires can average at least 1900 degrees F.
Structural reinforced concrete is also susceptible to the heat
produced in structure fires. When temperatures are below 200
degrees F, the concrete experiences little to no reduction in
strength. Concrete that is exposed to heat between 200 and
300 degrees will experience expansion of the aggregate and
shrinking of the cement matrix. This will result in micro
cracking, which introduces oxygen and water. Air and water
infiltration will result in a reduction in serviceability and
structure life. Temperatures above 750 degrees F produce
deterioration of the aggregate and a decomposition of the
cement matrix, resulting in a deterioration of structural
strength.