404 Hwy 19N, Meridian, MS, Copyright © 2019 Carter Miller Sansing, Ltd - All Rights Reserved
Assessment of Historic Structures for code compliance,
renovation, remediation, or additions
CMS has amassed much significant experience in the assessment, rehabilitation and retrofit of historic
buildings, especially those characteristic to timber and masonry structures built in the late 1800’s, early
1900’s throughout the south. When renovating or restoring these old buildings often renovation work
falls under the authority of the relevant Department of Archives and History
Most of the existing historic buildings have exterior masonry walls. When assessing walls that are 100
years old or older there usually a high probability that some type of deterioration will be discovered.
Deterioration in masonry can be a result of several factors including; poor original design or design
materials, corrosion and incompatibility of secondary materials, movement of settlement of the
supporting foundation, and moisture infiltration. Moisture damage can facilitate chemical breakdown
of the masonry and/or facilitate freeze/thaw fractures.
Generally the wood in these older buildings was harvested from virgin pine timber native to these
south eastern United States. This timber is noted for its substantial strength, much higher than that of
lumber harvested from our current fast growth timber. Although this virgin pine lumber is stronger it
remains susceptible to moisture, which produces rotting and deterioration, and long term creep
deflection can produce undesirable service conditions.
404 Hwy 19N, Meridian, MS, Copyright © 2019 Carter Miller Sansing, Ltd - All Rights Reserved
Assessment of Historic Structures for code
compliance, renovation, remediation, or
additions
CMS has amassed much significant experience in the
assessment, rehabilitation and retrofit of historic buildings,
especially those characteristic to timber and masonry
structures built in the late 1800’s, early 1900’s throughout
the south. When renovating or restoring these old buildings
often renovation work falls under the authority of the
relevant Department of Archives and History.
Most of the existing historic buildings have exterior masonry
walls. When assessing walls that are 100 years old or older
there usually a high probability that some type of
deterioration will be discovered. Deterioration in masonry
can be a result of several factors including; poor original
design or design materials, corrosion and incompatibility of
secondary materials, movement of settlement of the
supporting foundation, and moisture infiltration. Moisture
damage can facilitate chemical breakdown of the masonry
and/or facilitate freeze/thaw fractures.
Generally the wood in these older buildings was harvested
from virgin pine timber native to these south eastern United
States. This timber is noted for its substantial strength, much
higher than that of lumber harvested from our current fast
growth timber. Although this virgin pine lumber is stronger
it remains susceptible to moisture, which produces rotting
and deterioration, and long term creep deflection can
produce undesirable service conditions.